Cyber terrorism interview with Giovanni Raciti 4


afd4f71c-3993-49d8-82c8-abeed7451e3e-original

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regarding now yeah I’ll stop yeah yeah
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we can you know how do you okay
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initially believe it or not actually I
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started as a ceramic designer and I
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started learning Chinese Japanese and
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Korean cultures through art through
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ceramics tea ceremonies so having
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knowledge of culture because I really
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liked cultural studies and arts I think
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this was a rule leeway to learning about
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different cultures around the planet as
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a child I went to Europe I also went to
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Singapore and Bangkok and I really
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experienced different people other than
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the people of Australia and I really was
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fascinated with you know the world
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outside of Australia and as a traveler
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and I guess as a student you could
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probably relate to that and then I got
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into shrimp in university we I got into
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multimedia and there I learned a lot of
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languages so like lingo and a lot of
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programming languages always like basic
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basic as initially what put together
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things like a lot of the visuals from
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Microsoft basic nothing visual basic
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also by five and six I started creating
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calculation systems and things so from
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basic visual basic I always had a
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fascination with IT but looking at it as
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a cold cruel but artistic thing so then
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I thought all right get into designs
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I’ve got into design from multimedia I
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got into this outside
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I moved from Swinburne University in
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Melbourne
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mr. UTSA and it was really that’s where
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I learned a lot about technology at UTSA
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I learned a lot at Swinburne but I would
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say that it was really the springboard
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to getting me work and it was having a
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good police record and having everything
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also having good record I didn’t have
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much of a track record because I was
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thought student track record is hard
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it’s like okay you can get the
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qualification but you learn your stars
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on the job so like you have the military
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staff on the job it’s the act and the
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action that you do on the job you you
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pick up and you get done it’s get that
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respect your stories and what you’ve
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done then yes so basically from UTS I’ve
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got the design and Technology degree so
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postgraduate degree I’ve gone back and
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forth that’s a master’s degree at
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University of New South Wales at
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Kensington but I was found that I had to
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go back to UTS and really finish off
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what I started I do I’ve probably done
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about over 20 years of university and
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about five or six different universities
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in Australia I learned from the best
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doctors
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and then either work for someone from a
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lot of senators lot of parliamentary
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figures got to meet a lot of ministers
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and really I’d like to see how they run
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their department and really surveying
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different people on different you know
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walks of life and different leadership’s
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I was made a war fellow of society in
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London and it that was a greatest honor
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I’ve got that when I was 29
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they opened a lot of doors opened a lot
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of doors in the military in other
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industries different car industries I
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was he under career I guess machinery
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right I know that I was I grew up
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learning about Italian and German
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engineering and I’ve never really looked
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into South Korean industry or and
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looking at engineering so how I got him
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there was it’s really through various
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the looking at different intelligence
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working with different people so you get
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into the psychological of people
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psychology of people looking at their
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behavior their actions within agencies
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within entities how they work so it’s
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not just it’s not just the job itself
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but it’s how you read people and have a
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good memory of different people that you
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meet and I think you learn through
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feeling too so if you have a good
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feeling I think if you start if you
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remember their first surname they really
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made an impact on on your because you
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you’re walking around like a human
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recorder and you’re trying to you your
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soccer collecting data so when you
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collect data as a human being there is a
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bit of bias even though you don’t want
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it to be there but when you’re doing
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something quite digital you know with
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that it it’s what it is you know it’s
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it’s the baton and can be used so these
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and I think the thing information is
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I’ve always said in the informations
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with the price of you know it’s worth
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more than the price of the gold bars so
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I always think information is priceless
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so you can’t really you can’t really put
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a price on the way information is is
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dealt with because it can either
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information can either be used for good
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or for bad it can break an economy which
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will break a nation it’s about having
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evidence if that evidence helps with
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you know political you know points I’ve
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been on these things before so I that
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either you know create digital content
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or have the content and the display it
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for users and users to see it really
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depends on how things play out they can
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either play out with the way the
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wildlife of your nation to so one person
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can make a big difference so to the way
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the result of many citizens so you’re in
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a position of power a lot of things that
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they are done secretly they have done
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behind closed doors some things like
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even doing this interview you know not
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many people are forthcoming with
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information one because they be the sign
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that bond is loaded non-disclosure
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agreement I can tell you about so many
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companies like PwC where I worked with
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their data I work with General Electric
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I work with the Department of Defense
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I work with Telstra I know how their
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data works how the data goes from here
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to India here so Commonwealth Bank how
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they died to go skii to Hong Kong so we
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have like data allies we have physical
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alloys in warfare it’s all one thing
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III think there’s no difference I think
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is it it’s a web of connections of it’s
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like an ER diagram entity relationship
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diagram and you are walking around and
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every time you assess your environment
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you’re walking around like an ER diagram
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and you do it in your head like in
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mathematics but it’s a mental thing and
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you can pick all the connections it’s
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it’s an amazing no I don’t think I think
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some of its biological I think if you
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really got it like you’ve got that skill
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to visualize and to do I think you some
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can be a quiet I think some skills can
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be acquired but I still think you’ve got
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to have the spark to start off with but
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but really be reserved when to be
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reserved and pause when to pause but I
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think when you’re presenting something
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presented and and but really back up
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what you believe in so you can either
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change history with what you have you
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know you you look at you
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I know that you know there are a lot of
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soldiers that probably want snowman’s
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throat but that I realized that he was
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the one that actually created another
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way of destroying the enemy in warfare
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so even though they’re making the
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villain
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I believe his story was not always the
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villain I believe it was a hero at one
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stage I believe the media and other
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people behind the media could be
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government could not be and making the
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villain so these things like this so
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you’re either fighting for the Blues the
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Reds I’m lucky in my family we have many
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colors sorry it’s very very deep I’m
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very passionate with what I believe yeah
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my most I think it’s my grandfather’s
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brother he you know was it was a
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partisan in the war and he I think my
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family’s always been associated with a
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lot of intelligence people mi9 to get
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you know my grandma grandfather’s
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brother to the Pyrenees we’ve had you
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know dossiers from CIA a lot of
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different things actually also also that
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the other thing is we also have an
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organization in China that’s brought the
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story in the right to my uncle’s story
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during World War two
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so China ever wanted to create a film on
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my grandfather’s brother and in
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Australia I cannot say too much about
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him but all I could say is that he was a
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communist and he wasn’t Italy and he was
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the Communist Party didn’t get the
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accreditation of eliminating Hitler’s
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Nazis
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and I guess this is a good platform to
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say I guess but they say the Democratic
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be the thing the the second world war
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but when you’re speaking to soldiers and
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speaking to family members that really
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did change their nation I believe that
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the Communist Party in Italy did have a
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big impact especially when Russia came
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in and helped wipe out a lot of analysis
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so they all had protesters and in the
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end of the day they had to do that
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quotas of you know killing you know two
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nights is a day you know to survive so I
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think I think even now everything is
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digital hackers do things to survive do
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things to get kicks let’s get back to
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questions I know