An evening with the Fenechs


The Rotary Club of Drummoyne presented a special event

“An evening with the Fenechs”

A fundraiser for NRL Community’s campaigns

“Anti-Bullying” and “Voice against Violence”

The NRL deliver and promote programs that provide positive community outcomes through a national framework and delivery model that aligns and empowers the game’s stakeholders.

Mario Fenech, “The Maltese Falcon”, or “Muzza” is a Maltese Australian rugby league personality. A former player of the game for NSW, he is a regular guest on The Footy Show. His favoured position was as Hooker. In his later career a Prop-forward. He captained the Rabbitohs from 1986 to 1990. In 1988, Mario captaining a President’s XIII side against the touring Great Britain Lions and defeated the tourists 24–16. Mario is a Patron of NRL ‘One Community’ that uses current & former players to inspire others and support their Anti-Bullying and Voice Against Violence campaigns.

Jeff Fenech, retired Australian professional boxer, was trained by renowned Sydney-based trainer Johnny Lewis and won world titles in three weight divisions. He was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2002, and the Australian National Boxing Hall of Fame in 2003. He is currently a boxing trainer himself and owner of a sports clothing brand that carries his name.


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Step One, Stand Strong – Imagine you are a goal post on an NRL field, it stands strong and upright and can withstand the force of the game of Rugby League. Look down at your feet, imagine that they are planted firmly on the ground, like goalposts on a field. Make sure your body is standing upright and tall – even your shoulders and head. A bully will know from your body language if you are confident or not. If you appear confident the bully might back off.

Step Two, Stay Calm – Appearing calm and in control is important, particularly as bullies like to get a reaction from you. Stay calm with your body, eyes, and voice. On the inside you will be feeling any number of emotions including sad, angry, lonely or frustrated. This is all very normal and understandable. If you stay calm though the bully doesn’t get the reaction they want. The bullying might stop as a result.

Step Three, Respond Confidently – It is important to respond to bullies in a strong, clear voice. You should let them know that you would like the bullying to stop. Practise this skill at home in the mirror or to a teddy bear. It is important to choose your words carefully as you do not want to make the situation worse. Be polite and keep the statement short. Examples could include “Please stop bullying me I don’t like it” or “I would like the bullying to stop”. This gives the bully an opportunity to correct their own behaviour or put themselves in your shoes.

Step Four, Walk Away – It is important for victims of bullying to walk away and remove themselves from an unsafe situation. Walk away in a confident manner and never stay in a situation where you think you are at risk.

Step Five, Report – There are a number of reasons why ½ of children who are bullied do not report it. It could be that the victim is scared that reporting will make it worse. No one should have to put up with bullying and you are encouraged to tell two trusted adults about what you are experiencing. These adults could include your classroom teacher, parents, family members or a coach. If you are really unsure about who to report to then you can also contact the Kids Helpline 1800 551 800.

For teachers requiring more information or a copy of the NRL Tackle Bullying program please visit https://www.nrl.com/news/2009/07/23/one-community-and-lifeline-partner-up/.