Robot Limited

My Ancestral Origins – Y-DNA & mtDNA


Finding My Y-DNA Fathers & Brothers 25 Marker – Scotland, Wales & Isle of Man

EXACT MATCH
CountryMatch TotalCountry TotalPercentageComments
England1037045< 0.1 %
France15162< 0.1 %
Germany117298< 0.1 %
Ireland724826< 0.1 %
Scotland16176780.1%
United Kingdom411252< 0.1 %
United States516892< 0.1 %
Wales228070.1%
GENETIC DISTANCE -1
CountryMatch TotalCountry TotalPercentageComments
Australia12510.4%
Austria19590.1%
Brazil12620.4%MDKO: Brazil (1)
England60370450.2%MDKO: United States (1)
France1151620.2%
Germany18172980.1%MDKO: United States (1)
Ireland56248260.2%
Isle of Man1751.3%
Italy239840.1%
Mexico112150.1%
Netherlands12181< 0.1 %
Northern Ireland320940.1%
Portugal415260.3%
Russian Federation16264< 0.1 %
Scotland63176780.4%
Spain1137830.3%
Sweden27033< 0.1 %
Switzerland226650.1%
United Kingdom23112520.2%Kent (1)
United States34168920.2%
Wales728070.2%

Ancestral Origins – mtDNA HVR1 MATCHES

Finding My mtDNA HVR1 Mothers & Sisters (The Alps) – Southern Bavarian, Austrian

HVR1 MATCHES
CountryMatch TotalCountry TotalPercentageComments
Austria114410.1%
Germany117304< 0.1 %
Italy25433< 0.1 %
United States112406< 0.1 %

DNA analyses reveal that the salient haplogroup among Eliots (all spellings) is Celtic-Brittonic. The name is a variant of the Breton Halgoet, and access to French (Breton) registers of birth show clearly that many variants of Halgoet (the name of the pre-Conquest Viscount of the Halegouet or Halgoet, Judicael, a Breton, who was given the honour of Totnes subsequent to repulsion by a mainly Breton army, also led by the Breton, Brien de Penthievre, of the invasion mounted from Ireland by King Harold’s son’s.

PlaceIncidenceFrequencyRank in Area
United States176,9721:2,041193
England51,0611:1,089109
Canada22,4751:1,637150
Australia21,0681:1,128113
South Africa7,0441:7,6621,071
Northern Ireland3,8931:47458
Jamaica3,4481:833154
New Zealand3,3361:1,357145
Scotland2,8621:1,871336
Wales1,8451:1,677163

Descriptive Writing introductory reference

DNA analyses reveal that the salient haplogroup among Eliots (all spellings) is Celtic-Brittonic. The name is a variant of the Breton Halgoet, and access to French (Breton) registers of birth show clearly that many variants of Halgoet (the name of the pre-Conquest Viscount of the Halegouet or Halgoet, Judicael, a Breton, who was given the honour of Totnes subsequent to repulsion by a mainly Breton army, also led by the Breton, Brien de Penthievre, of the invasion mounted from Ireland by King Harold’s son’s. Brien was the younger brother of Count Alain of Richmond, also given vast lands, but in Yorkshire, by the Conqueror. Corrupted by Norman French, the Halgoet variants started with the letter ‘H’, ‘A’ or ‘E’. The Elliots came from the Morbihan, while the Alliots from the Pays Nantais in the Loire Atlantique. Both names are found today in higher concentrations in those French departements. Elligott, for example, is the English corruption of yet another Breton variant, Elegoet, found mainly in Finistere, the old homelands of the Halgoet tribe, dispersed during the Viking wars.— Keith Elliot Hunter (2014)


This surname is derived from the name of an ancestor. ‘the son of Elias’; from Elye (Eng. Elias), diminutive Elyot. One reason why Elliott is so largely represented in our directories is that it has absorbed nearly all our Elletts or Ellots, who are descended from Ellen; v. Eliot.

Elyot ad Cap’ Ville, Cambridgeshire, 1273.

Henry Ell’ot, Buckinghamshire, ibid.

Thomas Elvot, Cambridgeshire, ibid.

Eliottus de Balliol. Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinesi.

Richard Eliot, 1307. Writs of Parliament.

Adam Elyotson, 1379: Poll Tax of Yorkshire.

Thomas Elyott, rector of Dickleburgh, Norfolk, 1303: History of Norfolk.

1607. Married — Thomas Eliot and Margaret Waite: St. Michael, Cornhill.— A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames, written: 1872-1896 by Charles Wareing Endell Bardsley


Elliott,Elliot. —This name has three principal centres— one in the north of England, in the counties of Durham and Northumberland, and over the border in Roxburghshire and the neighbouring Scottish counties, another in Derbyshire, and the third in Bucks, Berks, and Sussex, whence it has extended into the other south – coast counties, excluding Kent. The scanty representation, or the absence of this name in the eastern coast counties from Kent northward to the borders of Durham, is remarkable.— Homes of Family Names in Great Britain (1890) by Henry Brougham Guppy


A name of doubtful origin. A William Aliot came into England with the Conqueror, and the name seems to be connected with Alis and Ellis. But Hals, speaking of the Eliots (Lord St. Germain’s family), says: “These gentlemen I take to be of Scots original and so denominated from the local place of Eliot, near Dundee.” D. Gilbert’s Cornwall, ii. 66. The name, though very widely spread, certainly seems in most instances to have come from N. Britain, where a great clan so called existed.— Patronymica Britannica, written: 1838-1860 by Mark Antony Lower


(English) Descendant of little Elijah or Elias (Jehovah is my God).— Dictionary of American Family Names (1956) by Elsdon Coles Smith


“Little Elias” in Old French. See Elias.— South African Surnames (1965) by Eric Rosenthal


=Eliot, q.v.— Surnames of the United Kingdom (1912) by Henry Harrison

User-submitted Reference

Elligott, Ellacott, Ellicott, McElligott are all variants of Elliot (all spellings) a French corruption of an old Breton tribal name Halegoet or Halgoet, also spelt as Allegoet and Elegoet. Alliot, Allott, which predominate in Loire Atlantique were alternative medieval scribal preferences for Elliot. All their ancestors were in the Breton contingent of William the Conqueror’s invasion army of 1066. The name is notorious among Breton historians for its many variants. Y-chromosome research now confirms this. See also the French websitewww.geopatronyme. It is almost certain that the first places of settlement were in the Devon and Cornish lands in which several Breton magnates were awarded lands for military service, principally the south-west, when Cornwall was given to the Conqueror’s Breton cousin Brien, count of Brittany, and in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire, where the scribal preferences Allott and Alliott are found, part of the extensive honour of Richmond with its lands in eleven counties. The English corruption Elligott and its Breton parent Elegoet, sound very much the same when they are pronounced.
Recent research, and the discovery of 16th-early 18th century maps held in the National Library of Scotland, have confirmed the suspicion that the anglicised name Elwald, later Elwood and the misspelling Elwand, was accepted by or forced on the Elliots when they were transplanted from the Eliot barony of The Brae in Perthshire, to Liddesdale, Scotland by Robert the Bruce, to effect his seizure of the lordship following treason committed by its lord, William de Soules in 1320. A careful reexamination of surviving documents shows that both names existed side by side for many years, with Elwald treated only as a charter name. Documents show that just as soon as Elliot chieftains became literate and were able to sign documents unaided, they signed their names as Ellott. The ‘i’ was reinserted during the early 17th century. Y-Chromosome research has confirmed the Breton origin of the Elliots, and the Breton source of a number of its variant names like Elligott,Ellacott and Ellicott, d erived from the Breton variant Elegoet. Like many knights of Norman, Flemish and Breton extraction, Elias d’Alliot (var.d’Elliot or d’Eliot) was awarded the barony of The Brae near to the foot of Glen Shee by William I (the Lion, 1165-1214) probably during the 1170s, before Elias’s name appeared as a witness in a charter of 1189.
Ulliott has long been recognized as a variant of Elliot – a name with some seventy variants, vide G MacDonald-Fraser, ‘The Steel Bonnets’. Most have not survived.
– anonymous submission


This surname refers to the Son of Elijah or Elias, meaning ‘gracious of God’. The name can also derive from either village and or the river of Elliot in Angus. The surname Elliott was first founded in Roxburghshire but has extended south of the border into Northumberland.- dinn315

(English) Dweller at 1 a Wall [Old English w(e)all (Latin uall-um] 2 a Well [Middle English and Dialectal English wall(e, a well or spring; for Middle English well(e, Old English welle, wiella, &c.] The surnames ‘atte Wall(e,’ ‘de la Wall(e,’ &c.

PlaceIncidenceFrequencyRank in Area
United States75,4411:4,789526
England19,8631:2,799372
Canada12,3911:2,970373
Australia8,7961:2,703359
Germany4,6971:17,0812,254
Ireland4,3461:1,075212
Sweden3,2241:3,054292
Mexico1,7071:72,7123,203
New Zealand1,6931:2,674379
Vietnam1,4641:63,2441,122

Descriptive Writing introductory reference

(English) Dweller at 1 a Wall [Old English w(e)all (Latin uall-um] 2 a Well [Middle English and Dialectal English wall(e, a well or spring; for Middle English well(e, Old English welle, wiella, &c.] The surnames ‘atte Wall(e,’ ‘de la Wall(e,’ &c., are pretty common in our 13th-14th cent. rolls. The village of Wall, Northumb., is near the Roman Wall. Wall, Staffs, is on the site of a Roman station.— Surnames of the United Kingdom (1912) by Henry Harrison


(English) Dweller at, or near, a wall such as the old Roman wall; dweller at, or near, a spring or stream; one who came from Wall (on the Roman wall, or near a stream), the name of several places in England; dweller at, or near, a pool or bog.— Dictionary of American Family Names (1956) by Elsdon Coles Smith


I.e. Norman dc Valle gaelicized as de Bhál. Also called Faltagh. This is one of the hibernicized Norman families, the many branches of which were settled in the country between Limerick and Waterford. IF 280; MIF 276; Map Lim— A Guide to Irish Names (1964) by Edward MacLysaght


Or de Valle. Ralph, Henry, Robert, Warin, Goscelin, Saifred, William, Richard de Valle, Normandy 1189-95 (Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae); Robert de Valle, Ralph and Richard de Valeia, Engl. c. 1198 (Rotuli Curiae Regis).— The Norman People (1874)


Nicholas and Odo de Muro, Normandy 1180 (Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae); Gilbert de Walle, John de la Walle, Engl. c. 1272 (Rotuli Hundredorum); Robert de Vallo, Warwick 1165 (Rot. Pip.).— The Norman People (1874)


See Walls, to which it is ordinarily pluralized.— Patronymica Britannica, written: 1838-1860 by Mark Antony Lower


A location name in Staffordshire.— British Family Names: Their Origin and Meaning (1903) by Henry Barber


“John at the Wall”—John Wall.— An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names (1857) by William Arthur

User-submitted Reference

The Wall name has origins in Normandy. William de Wall was one of strongbow captains in the invasion of England/Ireland. The Wall name is connected to the surname Du Val. Du Val has its origins in Normandy as well. My ancestors came directly from Durham England and settled in New Zealand as farmers. I have been told my family were supposed to be keepers of Hadrian’s Wall, hence living close to the wall, with origins in Durham. From study I have done on Hadrian’s Wall I found there was a mixed bag of races working on the wall hundreds of years ago. This is due to the Roman army building the wall. With this in mind there could be multiple people with the Wall surname; not because that is their real ancestry, but because they worked on or near Hadrian’s Wall.

In the 1970s my father received a letter from the people in Ireland stating any Wall family can lay clam to certain castles in Ireland. The Wall surname is not always connected to the Walls surname.- dwall081263

(Teutonic) Nail, Spike [O.H.Ger. and Old Saxon nagal = Gothic *nagl-s = Old Norse nagl = Dutch nagel = Old English nagel, m., a nail, etc.] The great prevalence of this name in America is largely due to German immigration. The A.-Saxon name is seen —vocalized—in Such English place-names as Nailsworth and Nailstone.

Descriptive Writing introductory reference

(Teutonic) Nail, Spike [O.H.Ger. and Old Saxon nagal = Gothic *nagl-s = Old Norse nagl = Dutch nagel = Old English nagel, m., a nail, etc.] The great prevalence of this name in America is largely due to German immigration. The A.-Saxon name is seen —vocalized—in Such English place-names as Nailsworth and Nailstone.

The commonness of Nagle in Ireland may be due to the early-eighteenth- century .German immigration; but the Hibernicization de Nógla seems to point to a French origin, poss. the place-name Nagel in the Eure Dept.— Surnames of the United Kingdom (1912) by Henry Harrison


This surname is derived from a geographical locality. A corruption of Nangle; v. Burke’s Landed Gentry. This surname seems to have made enormous strides in the United States. One cannot help thinking that there must be some second parentage. But v. Neagle.

1740. Married — James Nagle and Mary Rowson: St. George’s Chapel, Mayfair.

1706. — James Nagle and Margaret Hughes: St. George, Hanover Square.— A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames, written: 1872-1896 by Charles Wareing Endell Bardsley


(German) One who made nails.— Dictionary of American Family Names (1956) by Elsdon Coles Smith


“Nail” in Dutch and German.— South African Surnames (1965) by Eric Rosenthal

This surname is derived from a geographical locality. ‘of the tower.’ Old French tur, later tour, ‘a tower’ (Skeat). (a) ‘Of the Torr.’ Gaelic torr, a hill or mound, specially one of conical form.

Hugh de la Tour. Calendarium Inquisitionum Post Mortem.

Descriptive Writing introductory reference

This surname is derived from a geographical locality. ‘of the tower.’ Old French tur, later tour, ‘a tower’ (Skeat). (a) ‘Of the Torr.’ Gaelic torr, a hill or mound, specially one of conical form.

Hugh de la Tour. Calendarium Inquisitionum Post Mortem.

Henry atte Torre. Excerpta e Rotulis Finium in Turri Londinensi.

John de la Torre, 31 Edward I: Calendarium Genealogicum: Henry III-Edward I.

Hugh atte Torre, Somerset, 1 Edward III: Kirby’s Quest.

Edith atte Torre, Somerset, 1 Edward III: ibid.

1804. Married — James Torre and Rosellen Eliza Whitwell: St. George, Hanover Square.— A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames, written: 1872-1896 by Charles Wareing Endell Bardsley


There were old lands named Torr which formed part of the barony of Ballinbreich, Fife, in 1517 (Sibbald, Fife and Kinross, p. 83). Matthew de Torre de Inuerdouet witnessed a transaction between Serlo de Lascelis and the prior of St. Andrews, 1288 (RPSA., p. 346). Thomas de la Tour of Ayrshire rendered homage in 1296. His seal bears a castle with 3 towers (?)… Thorn, de Tv (Bain, II, p. 199,548). Adam Tore was One of those appointed to treat for the ransom of David h in 1357 (Foedera, III, p. 363). James Torre was made town’s ‘Lord of Bonaccord’ in Aberdeen, 1545 (CRA., p. 221).— The Surnames of Scotland (1946) by George Fraser Black (1866-1948)


(Anglo-Latin; A.-Celt.) Dweller at a Tower, or Tower-like Rock or Hill [Old English torr, a tower, rock, tor; Latin turr-is, a tower; cogn. with Celtic tor(r, a mound, heap, pile, conical hill, tower, castle] Henry atte Torre.—Fine-Rolls.

(Scandinavian) for the Old Norse Thóri-r, Thór-r (mod. Norwegian Tore): v. Thor.— Surnames of the United Kingdom (1912) by Henry Harrison


Probably the family of Torr came originally from the adjacent county of Warwickshire. The ancient and honourable family of Torre or De Turre, that resided for many generations at Westwood, near Haxey, Lincolnshire, came in the reign of Henry IV. from Warwickshire (Stonehonse’s “Isle of Axholme.”).— Homes of Family Names in Great Britain (1890) by Henry Brougham Guppy


In the W. of England, a craggy eminence, or more generally a hill. Places specifically so called are Tor-Abbey, Tor-Bryan, and Tor-Quay, all in Devonshire. De la Tor is the H.R. form.— Patronymica Britannica, written: 1838-1860 by Mark Antony Lower

User-submitted Reference

In Italian it means ‘tower’ and it is said to come from Spain, where there are many people with the surname, Torres. This would explain the great presence of this surname in South America.- volpia

This first name derives originally from the centuries-old German name Rodbert, which is a combination of two Old German words. These are the word ‘hroth’ which means ‘fame’ and the word ‘berht’ which means ‘bright’.

Descriptive Writing introductory reference

The surnames Roberts and Robertson come from the first name Robert.

This first name derives originally from the centuries-old German name Rodbert, which is a combination of two Old German words. These are the word ‘hroth’ which means ‘fame’ and the word ‘berht’ which means ‘bright’. Thus the original Roberts were ‘fame-bright’, meaning in the literal sense much the same as our modern word ‘illustrious’.

When this name spread to France it became transformed to Robert, and as such it was imported to England by the Normans in 1066. Robert soon became very popular. The first name Robert and the surname form both appear frequently in the Domesday Book. From the earliest records this name also appears in several variations, the most common being Robin which by the thirteenth century had started giving rise to variations of its own. Nowadays it is often impossible to tell which of these variations spring from the original Robert, and which from Robin. They range through Rob, Dob, Hob, Bob and Nob. In Scotland the variants, Rab, Rabbie and Robbie (as in the poet Rabbie Burns) soon appeared.

This host of variations gave rise to numerous surnames, all of which derive from the same source as Roberts and Robertson. The most common of these are Robinson, Robbins, Robson, Robeson, Dobkins, Hobkins, and even Dobbs and Dobson. All of these mean ‘son or dependant of Robert’ (through a variation or diminutive). Other related names in common use include Robbett and Robb.

The earliest mention of a form of Roberts (or Robertson) used as a surname is in the Domesday Book records for Kent in 1086, where Willelmus filius Roberti is mentioned.

At least two Roberts have become religious figures with a strong appeal to the common man. One was Frederick William Robertson (1816—53), also known as ‘Robertson of Brighton. He was a charismatic Church of England clergyman whose eloquent and psychologically astute sermons made him widely popular among the working class. However, his ecumenical views and ideas on reform generated intense opposition from within the Church. Another is the Bible-thumping, fire­breathing US evangelist and faith healer, Oral Roberts, who draws crowds of thousands of faithful. He has founded the Oral Roberts Evangelistic Association and Oral Roberts University, both in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

English livery-stable owner Thomas Hobson (1554—1631) of Cambridge, earned himself a place in history with his habit of insisting customers take the horse that happened to be nearest the door. This led to the expression ‘Hobson’s Choice’, i.e. ‘this or none’.

Scottish choral conductor Hugh Robertson (1874—1952) founded Glasgow’s noted Orpheus Choir in 1906.

Legendary cricketer Sir Jack Hobbs (1882—1963) was one of the greatest batsmen England ever produced. His feats include making 3,636 runs, including 12 centuries, in test matches against Australia, and a record number of 197 centuries in first-class cricket including, in 1926, the highest score at Lords (316).

William Dobson (1610—46) succeeded Van Dyck as portrait painter to Charles I.

When Sir Robert Peel founded metropolitan London’s police force in 1829, constables were at first called ‘Peelers’, as they still are in Ireland (the term was first applied to the force Sir Robert founded in Ireland when he was Chief Secretary for that country). This was quickly superseded by the still- common term ‘Bobbies’, from his first name.

Five United Kingdom towns are related to this name: Robertson (2), Robert Hill, Robertsbridge and Roberttown. Canada has 3 Robertsvilles while the United States has 6 name-related cities and towns. Ireland has a Robertstown, Liberia a Roberts- field and a Robertsport and India a Robertsganji. Geographic namesakes are widespread.

With about 231,000 namesakes Roberts is the 9th most popular name in England and Wales, while with 42,000 Robertsons it is Scotland’s 6th most common surname. Roberts is notably popular in and around Liverpool where an estimated one in about 125 families bears the name. In descending numerical order Cardiff, Manchester and Birming­ham are other Roberts’ strongholds. Robertson is notably popular in and around Edinburgh (one in 99 families bears the name). Around the world Roberts and Robertson are most common in Wellington (one in 284 families), Canberra (one in 334) and Auckland (one in 345). The United States tallies Roberts and Robertsons together-an estimated combined total of just under 550,000 making this their 19th most popular surname.— Peter Verstappen


See Robert. The family of Roberts of Glassenbury, co. Kent, extinct baronets, according to a genealogy in Harl. MSS., are descended from a William Rookherst, a Scotchman, who settled in Kent, in the third year of Henry I., and purchased lands at Goudhurst, which he called after his own name. This name he afterwards changed to Roobertes, which finally became Roberts. The tradition of descent from a Scotchman may be true or not, but that a North Briton gave name to a place in Kent called Rookherst, is a pure figment. The termination herst, or hurst, is scarcely, if at all, known in Scotland, while the Weald of Kent, where the Robertses first appear, abounds with it. The truth, doubtless, is, that the locality called from Saxon times Rookherst, gave the name De Rookherst to its early possessors, and that one of them in later times-the son of a Robert-dropped his local surname, and assumed a patronymical one.— Patronymica Britannica, written: 1838-1860 by Mark Antony Lower


This surname is derived from the name of an ancestor. ‘the son of Robert.’ The influence of this name was enormous, as our directories prove. Its chief nicks, were Hob and Dob, whence with dims. Hobkin, Hopkin, Dobinson, &c., which see. But the most famous diminutive was Robin. Hence our Robinsons, &c. (v. Robin).

Adam fil. Roberti, Oxfordshire, 1273. Hundred Rolls.

Agatha fil. Roberti, Oxfordshire , ibid.

Thomas fil. Roberti, Somerset, 1 Edward III: Kirby’s Quest.

It is useless giving other Illustrations. It ran a fine race with Richard and Roger, one giving us the nicks. Hick and Dick, the other Hodge and Dodge, all of which see.— A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames, written: 1872-1896 by Charles Wareing Endell Bardsley


Roberts. —A name rare or absent in the northern counties, where it is partially represented by that of Robertson, of Northumberland, a name very numerous over the most part of Scotland. The great home of Roberts is in North Wales, and next in order come South Wales, Shropshire, Monmouthshire, and Cornwall. It is scattered over the rest of England, but is least common in the eastern counties. The Proberts (Ap – Robert) increase its frequency in Monmouthshire and Herefordshire, and, to a less extent, in South Wales.— Homes of Family Names in Great Britain (1890) by Henry Brougham Guppy


ROBERTS: ‘son of Robert,’ which see. John Roberts (1768-1803), American painter, mathematician, and scientist, was born in Scotland.— The Surnames of Scotland (1946) by George Fraser Black (1866-1948)


(Saxon.) From Bod, counsel, and bert or bericht, bright or famous—famous in counsel.— An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names (1857) by William Arthur


“Fame-Bright” in Old German (Rod-Bert). See also Hobbs, Hopkins and Nobbs.— South African Surnames (1965) by Eric Rosenthal


(Welsh, Scottish, English) The son of Robert (fame, bright).— Dictionary of American Family Names (1956) by Elsdon Coles Smith


Robert’s (Son), v. Robert.— Surnames of the United Kingdom (1912) by Henry Harrison